Kavli Institute NeuroLunch

Sponsored by KIBS and the NeuroTechnology Center
By NTC
March 28, 2016

2015-2016 Kavli NTC Neurolunch Seminars

Seminars are held in:
Rm. 900 Sherman Fairchild Bldg. - Note the new room location
12:00 pm - 1:00pm
1212 Amsterdam Ave.
New York, NY 10027

 

Tuesday, March 29th, 2016

12:00PM

Katherine Nautiyal, PhD, Hen Lab
Assistant Professor of Clinical Neurobiology in Psychiatry

"Distinct circuits underlie the effects of serotonin on aggressive and impulsive behavior."

 

Presentation Summary:
Impulsive and aggressive behaviors are commonly comorbid and are both modulated by serotoninergic signaling, leading to the view that these behaviors have shared underlying neural circuit level mechanisms.  My postdoctoral research shows that the serotonergic contribution to the modulation of these behaviors, through the serotonin 1B receptor (5-HT1BR), can be dissociated temporally and spatially.  Specifically, developmental signaling in the forebrain contributes to later aggressive behavior, while impulsive behavior is affected during adulthood via modulation of GABAergic signaling.
 

Speaker Bio:
Dr. Kate Nautiyal completed her doctoral research with Dr. Rae Silver in 2011 in the Psychology Department at Columbia, in which she studied the role of serotonin in brain-behavior-immune interactions.  Her postdoctoral research, under the mentorship of Dr. Rene Hen is focused on the role of serotonin in the neural circuitry underlying impulsive and aggressive behavior.  Her recent studies have dissected the developmental and circuit-level contribution of the serotonin 1B receptor to impulsive aggression.  Kate’s current work uses genetic mouse models and pharmacology, as well as statistical modeling and epidemiology methods to further identify the neural circuit mechanisms through which serotonin modulates aggressive and impulsive behavior. Kate is the recipient of an Early Stage Investigator Award from the National Center for Responsible Gaming and a NARSAD Young Investigator Award, and was recently awarded a NIH Pathway to Independence Award (K99/R00) from the National Institute of Mental Health. Outside of the lab, she enjoys spending time outdoors - hiking, rock climbing, and backcountry skiing.